Election Day is May 15

Get ready to go vote, Omaha! Election Day for the 2018 primary election is May 15, 2018. Get more information in our complete guide to the primary and read our nonpartisan voters’ guide to see biographic information from candidates and their answers to several questions specific to their races.

We’ve got an interactive calendar with the deadlines, plus a printable promo flier below and available for download.

2018 Candidate Forum: Nebraska State Board of Education, District 8

The League of Women Voters of Greater Omaha held a moderated candidate forum for the candidates for state board of education, district 8 race. The candidates are Bob Meyers, Pat McPherson and Deborah Neary. The candidates are competing in the primary election to determine which two will advance to the general election in November.

Find out more about the primary in our Get Ready to Vote FAQ and nonpartisan voters’ guide. You can watch all our candidate forums and see all of our 2018 elections info under “2018 ELECTIONS” on our home page.

The League of Women Voters of Greater Omaha is a nonpartisan organization that never supports or opposes any candidate for office or political party. LWVGO’s mission is to inform and empower voters.

How to Use Vote411 to Get All the Info You Need to Vote

Vote411.org is a comprehensive guide to city, state and federal elections across the country. LWVGO uploads information specific to Douglas County to help voters in the Greater Omaha area make informed voting choices.

You can use this site to find info on how to register to vote, how to report any Election Day issues and find all kinds of info on voter eligibility, polling place locations and more.

You can also use Vote411 to compare candidates and print out your ballot selections to help you prepare for voting. Vote411 pulls candidate information from our nonpartisan voters’ guide and tailors what races and ballot issues you see based on your address. You can review where candidates running for office in your community stand on the issues, make selections for the candidates and issues you’d like to vote for, then save or print those selections to use a guide or reference when you actually vote. Vote411 does not collect personal information or store your address or selections (so your data will be lost when you leave the page).

Read the full guide below to get to know Vote411 and get prepared to go vote, Omaha!

Note: Any candidates, races or selections shown are selected randomly and for demonstrative purposes only. The League of Women Voters of Greater Omaha is a nonpartisan organization that never supports or opposes political parties or candidates.

How to Create a Personalized Voting Guide Using Vote411

To get voting information customized to you, navigate to Vote411.org and enter your address.

With your address entered, click Enter to continue. You’ll see a box with links for info “At a glance.” You can click the link to verify that your registration is correct, get polling place location and more. To create your personalized voting guide, click the green link to Get personalized information on candidates and issues.

This will take you to the beginning of the Personalized Ballot. The next step is Choose My Party. Use the dropdown to select the political party matching your registration, keeping in mind that Nonpartisans should select “None of These.” Then click Go to My Races.

You’ll see a list of races that you’re eligible to vote for based on your address and political party. For example, the screenshot below shows the races for a Nonpartisan voter who lives in downtown Omaha.

Select a row or click Make Selection to view the issue or candidate information for that race and to make a selection for your personalized voting guide. For ballot issues, you’ll see a description of the issue and the question you’ll vote on, just as you’ll see it on your ballot when you go to vote. Read the ballot question and then mark “yes” or “no” to add that answer to your ballot guide. You can skip the question by clicking the > beside Next Race or by clicking View My Races. If you make a selection, the application will automatically take you to the next issue or race on your list.

For races with just two candidates, you’ll automatically see a comparison of the candidates, showing their biographical info and answers to questions as they submitted them to LWVGO for our nonpartisan voters’ guide. You can read their answers and make a selection or skip this race.

For races with more than two candidates, you’ll see a list of all candidates and will be prompted to choose two to compare. You can compare two, go back, select another set and continue as needed to make your selection.

When you’ve made selections for or viewed all races, you’ll see a full list of all your selections. You can navigate back to make edits, review info or change your selections. When finished, click Finish.

Note: Any selections shown are made randomly and only for demonstrative purposes. The League of Women Voters of Greater Omaha is a nonpartisan organization that never supports or opposes political parties or candidates.

Enter your phone number, email or both to get your selections emailed or texted to you.

You can repeat this process however many times you like, saving and printing your results as needed.

You’re Registered to Vote. Now What?

Congrats on registering to vote! But what do you do next? You vote!

To break it down a bit further, here are some suggestions for next-steps after registering.

A few days after your registration, check that it’s been accepted and that your information is correct by looking yourself up on the Nebraska Voter Check website.

Your county election commission will mail you a postcard confirming your registration. This also has your districts and polling place location. Hang onto this card, but know that you can also look up your polling place location online.

If you’d like to vote early, you can download the application form for Douglas County or Sarpy County and then mail it to your election commission office or take a picture of it (filled out with your info) and email the picture to earlyvoting@votedouglascounty.com or earlyvote@sarpy.com.

You can get nonpartisan information on candidates by reading our voters’ guide and/or checking out Vote411.org. On Vote411, you can enter your address to get the information for candidates specific to your ballot.

Note: To vote in the 2018 primary (May 15), you must register before 6 p.m. April 30. To vote early, you must apply before May 4.

 

Read the 2018 Primary Election Voters’ Guide

LWVGO’s nonpartisan voters’ guide for the 2018 primary election is now available. Read, print and share the guide from this link: LWVGO Voters’ Guide.

Each election cycle, we contact candidates and invite them to participate in the print and online editions of the Voters’ Guide. Candidates provide their biographical information and their positions on selected issues. Candidates are aware in advance that the biographies and answers will be printed exactly as submitted without edits for content, spelling, punctuation or grammar.

The League of Women Voters of Greater Omaha is a nonpartisan organization that never supports or opposes political parties or candidates. We encourage voter education and empowerment.

2018 Candidate Forums: Douglas County Assessor Register of Deeds (Republican Candidates)

The League of Women Voters of Greater Omaha held a moderated candidate forum for the candidates on the 2018 Republican primary ballot for the office of Douglas County Assessor/Register of Deeds. The candidates are Walt Peffer and Kris Pierce. The winner of this primary race will go on to appear on the ballot in the general election in November.

The incumbent Douglas County Assessor/Register of Deeds, Diane L. Battiato, is a Democrat who will automatically advance to the general election.

Find out more about the primary in our Get Ready to Vote FAQ. You can watch all our candidate forums and see all of our 2018 elections info under “2018 ELECTIONS” on our home page.

The League of Women Voters of Greater Omaha is a nonpartisan organization that never supports or opposes any candidate for office or political party. LWVGO’s mission is to inform and empower voters.

Election Facts at a Glance: Get Ready for the 2018 Primary

Election Day for the 2018 primary is May 15 and the deadline to register or change your registration (if you’ve moved, changed your name, want to change your political party affiliation, etc.) is coming up fast. In Douglas and Sarpy counties, the deadline to register by mail, through an agent (like one of our voter-registration volunteers) or online is April 30. Douglas County residents can also register in-person at the election commission office any time before 6 p.m. on May 4.

As part of our mission to empower voters, LWVGO has put together a two-page printable factsheet about the election: ElectFacts: 2018 Primary. Below, we’ve collected some more extensive information about the primary and how to be a voter. We also have a Google Calendar available with the deadlines and will be collecting candidate forums and other resources on our website under the heading “2018 ELECTIONS.”

We encourage you to distribute this information with your friends, families and community members.

Get out there and go vote, Omaha!

About This Election

Nebraska primary basics

In this election, voters will narrow the field — candidates that “win” their primary elections will go on to compete in the 2018 general election in November.

Many of Nebraska’s state and local offices are nonpartisan (including the state legislature and public utility races), so, in these races, the top two candidates — regardless of their political party affiliation — will move on the general election.

For example, Nebraska legislative district 8 has three candidates on the ballot, all of whom are registered Democrats. The primary election next month will determine which two will appear on the general election ballot in November.

Other offices have partisan primary races. This means that the primary election determines which candidate represents a given party in the general election.

For example, the Nebraska governor’s race has two Republicans and three Democrats in the primary. There will be two winners — one for each party, and those two will go on to appear on the general election ballot.

Some races, both nonpartisan and partisan ones, won’t be on the primary ballot because the number of candidates is small enough that they all advance to the general election.

For example, there’s only one Democratic candidate for secretary of state (a statewide, partisan race) but there are two Republican candidates, so voters who vote the Democratic ballot won’t see secretary of state as an option but those who vote the Republican ballot will.

Omaha Public Schools’ bond issue

Residents in the Omaha Public School District will have an issue on their ballots, in addition to the primary candidates running for representation of their districts. OPS voters will decide to grant or not grant a bond to fund the school district. You can find out more about this issue from Go Vote, Omaha.

Who Can Vote

You are eligible to vote in Nebraska if you are:

  1. A Nebraska resident; and
  2. A US citizen; and
  3. At least 18 years old OR 17 years old but you’ll be 18 by Nov. 6, 2018; and
  4. Have never been convicted of a felony OR have been convicted of a felony but have completed your entire sentence (including probation/parole and incarceration), plus 2 years of wait-time. (Citizens with misdemeanor convictions or citizens who have spent time in jail, including while awaiting trial, do not lose their right to vote.)

What about political parties?

Voters must select a political party when they register. There are four recognized parties: Republican, Democratic, Libertarian and Nonpartisan.

Registered voters of all parties (including nonpartisans) can vote in the primary election.

What if I don’t have an address or are registered at my parents’ address but go to school out-of-state?

If you are registered at your parent’s home, you will need to request an early ballot to vote by mail.

If you live in a shelter, you can register to vote using the address of the shelter. You can vote early or on Election Day.

If you do not have an address at all, you can register to vote using the address of your county election commission office as your address. You can then vote early, in-person at the election commission office between April 16 and May 14. You cannot vote on Election Day.

If you are in a county jail, you can register to vote using your home address. You will need to request an early ballot to vote by mail.

How to Register to Vote

The deadline to register to vote in this election is April 30.

Nebraska residents can register online via the Nebraska Secretary of State’s website.

You can also register to by paper: You can fill out and print the form and mail it to your election commission or bring it in. (Mailed registrations must be postmarked by April 30.)

Douglas County Election Commission
225 North 115th Street
Omaha, NE 68154

Sarpy County Election Commission
501 Olson Dr. Suite 4
Papillion, NE 68046

Verify your registration and that all your information is correct by going to the Nebraska Voter Check website and entering your information under “Registration Information.”

How, When & Where to Vote

Nebraska voters can: vote early by going to their county election office (early in-person voting), vote early by mailing their ballot to their county election office (vote by mail), vote early by dropping off a ballot in a dropbox, or vote in-person at their polling place.

Early Voting

You can go to your county election commission office and vote early in-person any time between 8 a.m. Monday, April 16 and 6 p.m. Monday, May 14. Here are the office addresses:

Douglas County Election Commission
225 North 115th Street
Omaha, NE 68154

Sarpy County Election Commission
501 Olson Dr. Suite 4
Papillion, NE 68046

Vote By Mail (VBM)

In Douglas and Sarpy counties, you have to request a ballot to get it mailed to you. If you request a ballot, you cannot vote on Election Day. In Douglas County, you can also drop your ballot off at a dropbox instead of putting it in the mail.

To get a ballot mailed to you, fill out the form for your county and then email it in, mail it in or deliver it to your county election commission office. The deadline is 6 p.m. on Friday, May 4.

Douglas County Application
Email: earlyvoting@votedouglascounty.com
Dropbox Locations

Office Location:
225 North 115th Street
Omaha, NE 68154

Sarpy County Application
Email: earlyvote@sarpy.com
Office Location:
501 Olson Dr. Suite 4
Papillion, NE 68046

Verifying Your Ballot Was Received

After voting, it’s a good idea to check that your early/vote-by-mail ballot was received and accepted. To do this, go to the Nebraska Voter Check website, click on “Absentee Ballot” and enter your information.

At-Poll (Election Day) Voting

If you did not request an early/absentee/VBM ballot, you’ll vote on Election Day, which is Tuesday, May 15. You’ll go to your polling place any time between 8 a.m. and 8 p.m.

Your election commission office should have sent you a card with your polling place information and district information when you registered or changed your registration. But you can find your polling place online if you need to: Go to the Nebraska Voter Check website and enter your address.

How to Find Out Who & What Will Be On Your Ballot

Your election commission office should have sent you a card with your polling place information and district information when you registered or changed your registration.

If you live in Douglas or Sarpy County, you can also find out your districts online. You can then match up your districts with voting guides to find out more about the candidates running to be your representative in those districts.

You can find out who is running in each race/district on the Douglas County Election Commission website (this includes statewide races and U.S. House of Representatives District 2 but not races specific to only Sarpy County).

Because this is a primary and there’s a mix of partisan and nonpartisan races, there are different ballots for the different political parties. Every ballot has the nonpartisan races that you’re eligible to vote for plus the bond-issue question, if you live in the Omaha Public School District. Libertarian, Republican and Democratic ballots have all the nonpartisan races, the bond-issue question (if you live in the OPS District), plus the party candidates for the partisan races.

Find Your Districts: Douglas County

If you’re registered, you can use the Nebraska Voter Check website to find both your polling place information and your districts.

If you’re not registered (or just recently registered), go to the Douglas County Election Commission website and enter your address under “Finding Your Voting Information.” (Tip: Use the advanced search for better results.)

Find Your Districts: Sarpy County

Go to the Polling Place Locator website and enter your address. Under the Voting Info tab, you’ll see your polling place address and can even click on links to view sample ballots. Click on the Districts tab to see all of your representatives and the districts they represent.

Second Congressional District Democratic Debate

Join League of Women Voters of Greater Omaha and the Omaha Press Club for a debate between NE-02 U.S. House of Representatives candidates Brad Asford and Kara Eastman.

The event will be from 12 p.m. to 1 p.m. (with lunch at 11:30 a.m.) on Thursday, April 19 at the Omaha Press Club, 1620 Dodge St.

Call 402-345-8008 or email jeanie@opc.omhcoxmail.com for reservations. Tickets are $17.

Two Democrats are vying to unseat Republican Congressman Don Bacon in this November’s general election, Brad Ashford and Kara Eastman, will debate the issues April 19 at the Press Club. The winner will be decided in the May 15 primary election.

Ashford is seeking a second term in the U.S. House of Representatives after being defeated by Bacon two years ago. A businessman and a lawyer, Ashford served four terms in the Nebraska Legislature before being elected to Congress in 2016.

Kara Eastman came to Omaha in 2006 and started the Omaha Healthy Kids Alliance, a nonprofit organization that aims to protect children from lead poisoning and other environmental hazards. She is also a member of the board of Metropolitan Community College.

The debate will be moderated and recorded by WOWT Channel 6, the event’s television partner.

Early Voting in the 2018 Primary Election Begins Today

Today (Monday, April 9, 2018) is the first day that Nebraska voters can pick up vote-by-mail ballots. Election commission offices will begin mailing out these ballots today.

If you have not yet requested a ballot but would like to vote by mail, May 4 is the deadline to request a ballot. Note that requesting an early/vote-by-mail ballot will prevent you from voting at the polls. To complete the request, download and fill out the early vote form on the Nebraska SOS site. Send in the form to your county election commission office by the deadline.

Douglas County Commission address:  225 North 115th Street, Omaha, NE, 68154

Sarpy County Commission address: 501 Olson Dr. Suite 4, Papillion, NE, 68046

In-person voting at election commission offices (no application needed) begins April 16. Election Day (at-poll voting) is May 15.

The deadline to register to vote in the primary election is April 30. Nebraska residents can register online.

 

Learn More About the 2018 Omaha Public Schools Bond Issue

Voters in the Omaha Public Schools district will see a school bond issue on the 2018 primary election ballot. Election Day is May 15. Find out more about how and where to register and vote via the Douglas County Election Commission.

In this episode of Go Vote, Omaha!, host Geri Simon discusses the proposal with Mark Evans, the Superintendent of Schools, and Marque Snow, President of the Omaha School Board.

You can find out more from the school district — including details of their upcoming information sessions — on the OPS website.

Go Vote Omaha! is our locally produced informational television program. Watch Go Vote Omaha at 7:30 p.m. Tuesday nights on Cox channel 22 or CenturyLink channel 89 or anytime on YouTube.