Voting Rights Bills Introduced in First Days of Unicameral Session

The 106th Nebraska Legislature convened on Jan. 9 for its 90-day first session. Senators have until Jan. 23 to introduce legislation to vote on during this session (should it move out of committee). LWVGO policy team volunteers will be monitoring bills as the session continues, and will publish calls to action as needed.

Interested in volunteering as a Unicameral monitor?

Join us for our Legislative Update on Jan. 28. Following the Dine & Discuss event, the LWVGO policy team will meet to assign bills to monitor and talk about how to follow the Unicameral developments. If you’re not able to join us for the event, email web@omahalwv.org to learn more about how to get involved.

Several voting-rights-related bills have already been introduced.

The following text, identifying these introduced bills, comes from an update from Civic Nebraska. Sign up to be a Voting Rights Advocate with Civic Nebraska to get updates as more legislation is introduced and calls to action are published.

LB83, introduced by Sen. Justin Wayne, would provide for the immediate restoration of voting rights upon completion of a felony sentence or probation for a felony. This bill would ensure that nearly 8,000 Nebraskans who have served their time but who are currently barred from voting can fully rejoin our democracy and become more engaged members of their communities.

LR2, introduced by Sen. Carol Bloodwould rescind any previous resolutions calling for an Article V U.S. constitutional convention, removing Nebraska from the list of states with open applications that call for a dangerous constitutional convention.

LB211, introduced by Sen. Sue Crawford, provides for the nonpartisan election of county officers. This bill would help counties focus on policy, rather than parties, for local elections.

LB163, introduced by Sen. Megan Hunt, will encourage local control in elections by allowing counties of any size to take advantage of a vote by mail standard in one or more precincts, with the secretary of state’s permission. 

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